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Microsoft Inspire 2018: Day 3 Recap

Cloud | Posted on July 19, 2018 by Luke Black

This week, the Softchoice team is on the ground in Las Vegas attending Microsoft Inspire 2018 –Microsoft’s biggest partner conference. We’re bringing you the latest news and announcements. See the Day 1 recap here and Day 2 recap here.

The highlight of Day 3 of Microsoft Inspire was Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella’s keynote address.

After the morning sing-along to warm up the audience, the lights went out. When they came back on, Satya was smiling at the center of the stage where he received the most raucous applause from the entire stadium of 20,000+ attendees standing up to welcome him. This is what the Microsoft ecosystem thinks of Satya. He has transformed Microsoft and unleashed the good that technology can bring to the world.

In his address, Satya delivered an inspiring message about how we can work together to deliver on our mission to empower every person and organization around the world to achieve more.

I asked some of my Softchoice team members what they took away from Satya’s talk from both a business and employee experience perspective, and here are some of their favorite quotes:

For Almir Pervan, Microsoft Sales Manager, it was a quote about customer passion and about how Microsoft has evolved over the course of the past four years: “What binds us together is not our success but the success our customers achieve. Even more exciting times are ahead in the world of technology, but not without a full commitment to privacy and ethical principles.”

What resonated most with Andrew Caprara, our Senior Vice President of Strategy and Business Development, was Satya’s advice to prospective new employees: “Don’t come work here if you want to be cool. If you want to make others cool, then join Microsoft.” That’s what he called customer obsession.

And for Julija Noskova, our Vice President of Marketing, it was Satya’s strong message about Microsoft’s culture of diversity and inclusion: “If you want to serve the world, you’ve got to represent the world.”

Throughout the day, we also heard from Microsoft solution leaders who introduced new resources and assets that will enable Softchoice to tailor and deliver more modern life solutions to our customers.

Finally, as Microsoft’s largest Azure consumption partner in North America, we are excited to see the continued expansion of Azure platform capabilities to continue to help hundreds of companies increase their IT agility.

This week has been very inspiring and the whole Softchoice team looks forward to new and exciting partnership opportunities with Microsoft to serve our customers and unleash their potential through technology.

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